Garden Calendar

helleborus orientalis pink ladySpring

March

  • Bushes may still be transplanted if buds have not begun to swell.
  • Slowly remove winter mulch from perennials as new growth appears.
  • Prune roses.
  • Prune dead branches from bushes and trees.
  • Prune ornamental grasses to the ground.
  • Sow seeds for summer blooming annuals indoors.

April

  • Deadhead spring flowering bulbs but don’t cut off foliage.
  • Divide fall blooming perennials.
  • Plant new bushes and perennials from the garden center.

May

  • When spring bulb foliage has browned and is easy to pull up, remove it.
  • When danger of frost is gone, plant annual flowers in beds and containers.
  • Plant herbs and vegetables.
  • Mulch plantings.
  • Fertilize annual beds every two weeks.
  • Watch roses for pests and spray if necessary.
  • Deadhead (remove old blossoms) annual flowers to keep them full.
  • Prune spring flowering shrubs (like azaleas) after they flower.
  • Pinch back chrysanthemums and asters to keep upright.
  • Control slugs and snails.
  • Remove weeds before they go to seed.

echineceaSummer

June

  • Fill in bare spots in the garden with annuals and perennials.
  • Continue to deadhead and pinch back leggy annuals.
  • Fertilize annuals every two weeks and vegetables monthly.
  • Control slugs and snails.
  • Stay ahead of weeds.
  • Compost (healthy) plant material.

July

  • Make sure your garden is getting enough water; water deeply instead of a little every day, allowing surface soil to dry between watering; water in the morning.
  • Pinch back chrysanthemums until mid-month.
  • Continue to deadhead and weed.
  • Feed hummingbirds and keep feeders clean.

August

  • Keep watering deeply (the garden should get an inch of water a week) and fertilizing.
  • Containers and hanging baskets may need to be watered daily.
  • Keep the birdbath filled and the water changed often.
  • Continue to deadhead and weed.

astersFall

September

  • Remove spent annuals.
  • If weather stays hot, make sure plants have enough water.
  • Divide overgrown perennials.
  • Mark location of perennials or make a map of your garden.
  • Plant shrubs.
  • Do not prune spring flowering shrubs.
  • Plants spring flowering bulbs when ground temperature goes to 60 degrees.
  • Plant flowering kale, cabbage and mums.
  • Continue to weed.

October

  • Make sure new plantings and divisions have enough water.
  • Prune stalks of summer perennials to the ground.
  • If spring flowering bulbs weren’t planted in September, get them into the ground now.
  • After frost, rake any dead annuals from the garden.
  • Continue to weed.
  • Remove shredded mulch.
  • Buy amaryllis.

November

  • Shrubs and perennials can be transplanted if soil is not too wet.
  • Pot spring flowering bulbs (put them in a cool dark place until growth emerges then place in a bright window).
  • Feed the birds.

dogwood arcticfireWinter

December

  • Shrubs and perennials can be transplanted if soil is not too wet.
  • Pot spring flowering bulbs (put them in a cool dark place until growth emerges then place in a bright window).
  • Feed the birds.

January

  • Remove snow from bushes and tree branches, but if they are icy and bent to the ground leave them in place.
  • Use a plant-friendly ice melter.
  • Feed the birds to help them survive and stay in your garden.
  • If bulb growth starts to emerge, cover with mulch.
  • Begin to buy seeds.
  • Repair tools for spring use.
  • If soil is not frozen or wet it may be turned now.

February

  • Deciduous bushes may be transplanted now (before buds swell).
  • Summer flowering bushes may be pruned, but do not prune spring bloomers.
  • Plants which have pushed out of the ground from frost heave should be pressed back in place.
  • Perennials may be divided and moved (before new growth appears).
  • Turn the compost pile.